Tuesday, 19 January 2021

One, two, three

 Ì am fond of old rhymes and find it sad that sitting In front of a box watching "Beauty and the Beast" for the umpteenth time has, in many cases, replaced listening to one's  parents or grandparents recite rhymes

One of the fascinating things about old rhymes is that, because they were anonymous and passed on by word of mouth, numerous variations on the same theme would arise.  Memory also plays its part so it will be of interest to see if my bother, GB, recalls it exactly the same as I do.

For example, the version of 'One, two, three, mother caught a flea' that I was taught by my mother was -

One, two, three, mother caught a flea,

Put it in the teapot, 

Made a cup of tea.

The flea jumped out,

Mother gave a shout.

In rushed father with his shirt hanging out.


If you were taught that rhyme were the words the same or slightly different?    When I Googled it there were various versions but the thing that surprised me most was that some had three verses, the second beginning 'Four, five, six,' and the third 'Seven, eight, nine'.





14 comments:

  1. I don't know that rhyme. I do recall my dad reciting poetry, like Robert Service, in a dramatic manner. It is sad that dramatic recitations from memory are disappearing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My Mum recited a lot of poetry and I loved it. Ì, in turn, recited it for my daughters. Perhaps I'll recite one each time I Skype the grandchildren (assuming it's going to be years before I actually see them again.)

      Delete
  2. Hi John, I've never heard that rhyme. The one that springs to mind, that somehow sounds sort of familiar is one of my grandmother's favourites about keeping our shirts tucked in,
    "Giddy giddy gout!
    Your shirt's hanging out
    Five miles in
    And five miles out!"
    There was another one about pulling your socks up which I can't for the life of me remember today.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Old rhymes often have a fascinating background history - also, more often than not, of a rather cruel nature, picking up themes of warfare and crime. We were taught some fun ones as little children, but of course not the same as you :-) Ours were often in our Swabian dialect.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some of the British ones also have very saucy origins like "Lucy Locket lost her pocket.."

      Delete
  4. Interestingly I can recall Mum saying that and wonder now, why I found it so hilarious. But I did.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Never heard that rhyme and sadly, TV replaced much story telling or poetry reading time in our household.

    ReplyDelete
  6. While i do not remember this one, i remember being surprised when i learned that "One, two, buckle my shoe" went on beyond "Nine, ten, a big, fat hen."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Eleven twelve - dig and delve... Not sure after that though.
      Fourteen - maids a courting??

      Delete
    2. Weren't the 'maids a courting something to do with Christmas?

      Delete
  7. I am old but I didn't know that rhyme. Maybe we had different ones here in the states. I remember...Yesterday upon the stair I saw a man who wasn't there. He wasn't there again today. I wish to heck he'd go away.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love sitting in front of the box watching "Beauty and the Beast" (original Disney animated version, not live action new one)... and I have no children! The narrated intro always gives me chills, and a bit of a tear in the eye... and yes, I know all the words to all the songs, and sing along!

    ReplyDelete

Hello - thanks for dropping by to leave a comment. Your comments are much appreciated even if I don't always reply. They will appear as soon as they have been moderated.

Blog archive